Success Stories Pt 4

Pam L. writes

My grades in your class are not stellar, but there is a clear difference between the ways I studied for tests where I received 45-65% compared to when I received 80% and above. Every time I got the better scores, I did the following: I read the chapter through and hand wrote the study questions and answers in my own words. This helped a lot to mentally process the information. Lastly, on test day I take an hour or so for someone to randomly ask me questions from the text, to get my synapses fired up. (It also helps when I make up my own analogies to the suggested theories, and studying right before bed helps a lot!)

Dr. Dewey comments:

Every term there are a few students who write out answers to all the questions. I admire their dedication, and it is hard to argue with a technique that works. But it sounds so time-consuming! I wonder if it is really necessary. As mentioned earlier in Chapter Zero, I suggest that students simply cover the text column with a blank sheet of paper (so the answer in the text cannot be seen in peripheral vision) and use the study questions as a self-quiz. That accomplishes much the same thing as writing out the answers, in a lot less time. But maybe for some people, the act of writing makes the information sink in, in some special way.

Scott S. writes

I started this class off by taking my reading a little too lightly. I only highlighted the part that pertained to the questions and didn't really read the rest of the paragraph. I ended up making a 45, 54, and a 15 on my quizzes. So I changed my way of studying by not using a highlighter and instead putting asterisks beside important things. I read the chapter twice and then tried to answer the questions. Since then I have made an 80, 90, 80, and I retook the 15 and made an 80 on it.


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Copyright © 2007 Russ Dewey